The Nobel Peace prize was awarded to Leymah Gbowee, Liberian president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Yemeni activist Tawukul Karman for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work. (Nobelprize.org). 
Leymah Gbowee was a powerful force in ending Liberia’s second civil war by mobilizing women to protest. They held sit-ins, withheld sex, created blockades and called women to mobilize over radio broadcasts. Her memoirs were published this year, called Mighty Be Our Powers (Link to Catalog). It’s not in the Brentwood Library, but you can request it and have it sent to you from another library. We do have the documentary Pray the devil back to Hell (Link to Catalog), which chronicles the womens’ struggle for peace.
Ellen Johnson Sirleaf is the president of Liberia, holding the position as Liberia’s first democratically elected female head of state and the second black female head of state in the world. Inaugurated in 2006, she replaced the dictatorial reign of Charles Taylor and instituted reforms to restore infrastructure and eliminate corruption in government. Her biography is in the Library, titled This Child will be Great (Link to Catalog; Book on CD).
Tawukul Karman (Also spelled Tawakel) is a Yemeni journalist and political activist. She’s known for addressing issues of free speech and human rights abuses in Yemen, also calling for Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh to cede power. She is the founder of Women Journalists without Chains, a text-message news service alerting its subscribers of human rights abuses in Yemen. (Women Journalists Without Chains)

The Nobel Peace prize was awarded to Leymah Gbowee, Liberian president Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Yemeni activist Tawukul Karman for their non-violent struggle for the safety of women and for women’s rights to full participation in peace-building work. (Nobelprize.org). 

Leymah Gbowee was a powerful force in ending Liberia’s second civil war by mobilizing women to protest. They held sit-ins, withheld sex, created blockades and called women to mobilize over radio broadcasts. Her memoirs were published this year, called Mighty Be Our Powers (Link to Catalog). It’s not in the Brentwood Library, but you can request it and have it sent to you from another library. We do have the documentary Pray the devil back to Hell (Link to Catalog), which chronicles the womens’ struggle for peace.

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf is the president of Liberia, holding the position as Liberia’s first democratically elected female head of state and the second black female head of state in the world. Inaugurated in 2006, she replaced the dictatorial reign of Charles Taylor and instituted reforms to restore infrastructure and eliminate corruption in government. Her biography is in the Library, titled This Child will be Great (Link to Catalog; Book on CD).

Tawukul Karman (Also spelled Tawakel) is a Yemeni journalist and political activist. She’s known for addressing issues of free speech and human rights abuses in Yemen, also calling for Yemeni President Ali Abdullah Saleh to cede power. She is the founder of Women Journalists without Chains, a text-message news service alerting its subscribers of human rights abuses in Yemen. (Women Journalists Without Chains)

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