"[The] average daydream is about fourteen seconds long and [we] have about two thousand of them per day. In other words, we spend about half of our waking hours — one-third of our lives on earth — spinning fantasies."

The Storytelling Animal – the science of how we came to live and breathe stories. (via explore-blog)

Why don’t you feed your daydreaming fantasies with a good book? The library has its Summer Reading going on right now. With the temperatures sky high there’s no better place than the cool confines of your community cornerstone, the local library, to let your imagination roam in the wordsmith’s playground.

Read last year’s breakout Gone Girl , Sylvia Day’s sexy first book Bared to You  in the trilogy, Dan Brown’s Inferno, World War Z (Read the Book before the Movie), and Second Honeymoon by James Patterson and Howard Roughan. They are all here, available as Ebooks even! It’s your choice, Brick or Bit (Brentwoodnylibrary.org).

(Source: , via explore-blog)

33% of the workforce were women at the end of World War II. In Oak Ridge, Tennessee, a war community of 75,000 worked for the war effort, and although their community used more electricity than New York City, their project was unknown. Secrecy was a requirement. A rumor coould cost you your job and home. Little did they know that they were enriching Uranium to create the World’s Deadliest Weapon: The Atom Bomb. Denise Kiernan describes the lives of the young Southern Women  recruited to work at Oak Ridge, who considered their stay temporary. Now forming the nucleus of the town, they reflect back on what their effort meant for themselves, and the world. 

Girls of Atomic City : the untold story of the women who helped win World War II - Denise Kiernan (Link to Catalog)
Women at work on C-47 Douglas cargo transport, Douglas Aircraft Company, Long Beach, Calif. (LOC) (FSA / Office of War Information Color Photographs)

33% of the workforce were women at the end of World War II. In Oak Ridge, Tennessee, a war community of 75,000 worked for the war effort, and although their community used more electricity than New York City, their project was unknown. Secrecy was a requirement. A rumor coould cost you your job and home. Little did they know that they were enriching Uranium to create the World’s Deadliest Weapon: The Atom Bomb. Denise Kiernan describes the lives of the young Southern Women  recruited to work at Oak Ridge, who considered their stay temporary. Now forming the nucleus of the town, they reflect back on what their effort meant for themselves, and the world. 

Girls of Atomic City : the untold story of the women who helped win World War II - Denise Kiernan (Link to Catalog)

Women at work on C-47 Douglas cargo transport, Douglas Aircraft Company, Long Beach, Calif. (LOC) (FSA / Office of War Information Color Photographs)

Did you know that during the Normandy Campaign, there were 125 millions maps handed out? June 7th, 1944, was the second day of Operation Overlord and Operation Neptune at Normandy, France. The Operations would continue until late August, when the Allies defeated the Axis in the battle of the Falaise pocket, culminating in the Liberation of Paris on the 25th. 
Read more about the brave soldiers by clicking here and seeing all the books we have on the D-Day invasion. Of the 9,387 Americans buried at the American Cemetery at Colleville-sur-Mer, 4 are women. Click here to read the story of one of them, Elizabeth A. Richardson, by the National Archives. The three other women were part of the famous “Six Triple Eight”, the African-American Battalion of the Women’s Army Corps formed at the behest of Eleanor Roosevelt. This Patch article looks to learn more about their individual stories as well as gives a short description of the Six Triple Eight. 

Did you know that during the Normandy Campaign, there were 125 millions maps handed out? June 7th, 1944, was the second day of Operation Overlord and Operation Neptune at Normandy, France. The Operations would continue until late August, when the Allies defeated the Axis in the battle of the Falaise pocket, culminating in the Liberation of Paris on the 25th. 

Read more about the brave soldiers by clicking here and seeing all the books we have on the D-Day invasion. Of the 9,387 Americans buried at the American Cemetery at Colleville-sur-Mer, 4 are women. Click here to read the story of one of them, Elizabeth A. Richardson, by the National Archives. The three other women were part of the famous “Six Triple Eight”, the African-American Battalion of the Women’s Army Corps formed at the behest of Eleanor Roosevelt. This Patch article looks to learn more about their individual stories as well as gives a short description of the Six Triple Eight. 

"But I don’t want comfort. I want God, I want poetry, I want real danger, I want freedom, I want goodness. I want sin."

Aldous Huxley - Brave New World (Link to Catalog) (Goodreads)